Muller Family
Muller Tree

HOME

A Brief Family History
Family Reunion
Contact Me
Muller Tree

Descendants of Peter Muller

 

 

Generation No. 1

 

1.  PETER1 MULLER (Source: Chester Warner cv_warner@cox.net.).

 

Notes for PETER MULLER:

his name is may have been either Paschal or Pascal...I believe this because the treaty gives the name of Paschal Muller along with Alexander, Margaret and Socra....when I contacted the tribal rolls, they said Katherines last name was listed once on the rolls as Pascal...so if she had her fathers first name for her last on the rolls, and then as an adult she took her fathers last...that would give is the name Pascal Muller.

______________________________

The issue of what Band our Muller belonged to is a bit confusing, from Potawatomi history it states that the Forest and Prairie Band were sent to Council Bluffs, and then they were sent to Kansas...it also states that in 1867 the Citizen Band left Kansas for Oklahoma...this must be when Stutelys children went with the Citizen Band. Soooo, which is it, the Prairie or the Forest Band?

 

 

From http://www.tolatsga.org/pota.html

In 1600 the Potawatomi lived in the northern third of lower Michigan. Threatened by the Ontario tribes trading with the French (Neutrals, Tionontati, Ottawa, and Huron) during the late 1630s, the Potawatomi began leaving their homeland in 1641 and moved to the west side of Lake Michigan in northern Wisconsin. This was completed during the 1650s after the Iroquois defeated the French allies and swept into lower Michigan. By 1665 all of the Potawatomi were living on Wisconsin's Door Peninsula just east of Green Bay. They remained there until 1687 when the French and Great Lakes Algonquin began driving the Iroquois back to New York. As the Iroquois retreated, the Potawatomi moved south along the west shore of Lake Michigan reaching the south end by 1695. At about the same time, one band settled near Jesuit mission on the St. Joseph River in southwest Michigan. Shortly after the French built Fort Ponchartrain at Detroit in 1701, groups of Potawatomi settled nearby. By 1716 most Potawatomi villages were located in a area between Milwaukee to Detroit. During the 1760s they expanded into northern Indiana and central Illinois.

Land cessions to the Americans began in 1807 and during the next 25 years drastically reduced their territory. Removal west of the Mississippi occurred between 1834 and 1842. The Potawatomi were removed in two groups: the Prairie and Forest Bands from northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin went to Council Bluffs in southwest Iowa; and the Potawatomi of the Woods (Michigan and Indian bands) were relocated to eastern Kansas near Osawatomie. In 1846 the two groups merged and were placed on a single reservation north of Topeka. Arguments over allotment and citizenship led to their separation in 1867. The Citizen Potawatomi left for Oklahoma and settled near present-day Shawnee. Most of their lands were lost to allotment in 1889. The Prairie Potawatomi stayed in Kansas and still have a reservation. Several Potawatomi groups avoided removal and remained in the Great Lakes. Three are in Michigan: the Huron Potawatomi in the south-central; the Pokagon Potawatomi in southwest and northern Indiana, and the Hannaville Potawatomi of upper peninsula. The Forest County Potawatomi live in northeast Wisconsin, and the Canadian Potawatomi in southern Ontario have become part of the Walpole Island and the Stoney Point and Kettle Point First Nations.

__________________________

 

Notes from Vincent Correll

1820: Peter Mulleur: family was in Michilimackinac County (far north of Lake Michigan, later Macinac) [census display 120010/20000-One male under age 10; 2 males 10 to 16; 1 male over 45; 2 females under 10] this was from the book Michigan Census 1710-1830 p-128

   *that would be Catherine under age 10 and a sister and we see Alexander also under age 10-because the mother was an Indian, she poss is not listed

 

 

1822 Peter Mulleur was paid for hauling timber for new buildings in Point au Sable. (Au Sable Pt. near Tawas City, at mouth of Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron) Michigan census 1710-1830. American fur company

 

1823 Peter Mullar voted

Michigan census 1710-1830 etc [MI-Mi1822-01]

 

1825 Peter Muller voted

Michigan census 1710-1830 etc [MI-Mi1822-01]

 

1830 November 25 Peter Muller voted in Chicago IL

 

Later in Council Bluffs it is reported that Stutely Wick's father in law was a proff wheelwright who worked at the mill with Stutely

______________________________________________

Very near Billy Caldwell in 1830 is a name that is a bit faded...Peter Mu?er...one male under 10, 1 male 5 to 10, one male 10 to 15, one male 40 to 50, one female 10 to 15, one female 20 to 30 he also has one free colored person with him age 10 to 24

that is it this is Putnam County, IL, 1830 census on the side it says Peoria County and Territory

________________________________________________

Note of interest....

In the Lds IGI there is a

Peter W. Muller who is married to a Catherine Maier they married c 1840

they had these children in Early Illinois

Sophia 1841 of St. Clair

Frederick 1843 of St. Clair

William 1845 of St. Clair

Peter Jacob Jan 18, 1847 St. Clair

Charles 1848 of St. Clair

Frederic 1855 of St. Clair

Edward 1857 of St. Clair

This is just a note for future

 

     

Children of PETER MULLER are:

2.                i.       CATHERINE2 MULLER, b. Abt. 1818, Illinois; d. April 29, 1881, Council Bluffs, Potawatamie, Iowa.

3.               ii.       ALEXANDER MULLER, b. Abt. 1819, Michigan; d. 1890.

                 iii.       SOCRA MULLER.

 

Notes for SOCRA MULLER:

This person is listed in the treaty of 1833 but not sure who it is.

_________________________

There is a Socra Holm, male, listed in the 1920 census...he was born in Iowa in c 1883 his mother born in Illionois and father from Maine.could his mother be Soca Muller, Our Socra would have been born in either Chicago or Michigan and Socras children would have been born in Iowa. He is living in Oregon

 

                 iv.       PASCHAL MULLER (Source: 1863 Pottawatomie tribal roll.), b. Abt. 1818 (Source: 1863 Pottawatomie tribal roll.).

 

Notes for PASCHAL MULLER:

This person is listed on the treaty in 1833 and again as Paskal Miller in 1846 in Iowa

He is listed in the tribal rolls of 1863-listed as a male age 45

________________________________________

 

The1842 Potawatamie Indian of Council Bluffs Pay Roll for "Half Breeds"

 

Notes:

 

This annuity roll is found on "Iowa Territorial Papers", National Archives Microcopy No. 325, Roll 78, blip 534. This particular pay roll differentiates each of the tribal bands living there. Blips 534, 535 and 536 begin by showing "Wau-bon-see's Band" and ends by showing "Half Breeds". The following names come from the latter enumeration.

 

The following list includes: Name, # males under 10 years, males between 10 and 40, males over 40, females under 10, females between 10 and 40, females over 40.

Paschal Muller         ...0...2...0...1...0...1

His sister Catherine Wicks was also listed on this roll...see her notes

__________________________________

The 1843 Pay Roll for Potawatomie Annuities at Council Bluffs sub-agency for "Half Breeds"

 

Notes:

 

This annuity roll is found on "Iowa Territorial Papers", National Archives Microcopy No. 325, Roll 78, blip 757. Blip 757 begins the 1843 Chippewa, Ottawa and Potawatomie annuity pay roll prepared by Richard S. Elliott, Council Bluffs sub-agent. This excerpt is pages 18 and 19 of the pay roll.

 

BE CAREFUL: This is NOT a census, but a listing of those persons--and the number in each family--who are of mixed blood living in each family who qualify for an annuity payment as a member of this tribe of Indians. For instance, many husbands, who were not of mixed blood, are not counted.

 

The following list includes: Name, # men over 40 years, men under 40, women over 40, women under 40, children over 10, children under 10.

Paschal Muller          ...0...1...0...1...0...1

Both Catherine and Alexander are listed here as well

 

                  v.       MARGARET MULLER.

 

Notes for MARGARET MULLER:

she is also listed on the treaty of 1833

 

                 vi.       MAH-MOS-KE MULLER (Source: 1863 Pottawatomie tribal roll.), b. Abt. 1828 (Source: 1863 Pottawatomie tribal roll.).

 

Notes for MAH-MOS-KE MULLER:

Not sure how she fits into the family

living with her in the 1863 tribal rolls is

Margaret Muller female age 23

Mary Ann Muller female age 14

Therise Mah-Mos-Ke female-age 2

 

                vii.       VICTORIA MULLER, b. Abt. 1822, Illinois.

 

Notes for VICTORIA MULLER:

This is most likely not a child of this family...but she does fit in somewhere.

I find her in the 1870 census

State:  Kansas    

County:  POTTAWATOMIE    

Locale:  LOUISVILLE TWP    

Series:  M593    

Roll:  441    

Part:  1    

Page:  399A    

Plommian?, Simm (may be simon)-age 27-male-white-farmer-2000-600-born Canada

", Margaret-27-female-indian-keepinghouse-born Iowa-cannot read or write

Muller, Victoria-age 48-female-indian-no occupation-realestate 1000-personal prop 100-born Illinois-cannot read or write

Stewart, Mary-6-female-indian-at home-born Kansas

 

I believe that Victoria is the sister in law to Katherine and Alexander. Margaret listed in this census, I think is her daughter and so Victoria is living with her son in law and daughter. The 6 year old Mary is a mystery, unless Margaret was married before she married this Plom??? man

____________________________________

Here they are again in 1880

Household:

 

 Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace

 Frank WILLMOTT   Self   M   Male   W   64   IL   Farmer   IL   CANADA  suffered from Palsy the day of census takers visit

 Victoria M. WILLMOTT   Wife   M   Female   NA   58   IL   Keeping House   IL   IL 

 Margeret PLEMANDON   Other   W   Female   NA   35   IA      IL   IL  suffered from consumption

 Mary MULLER   Other   S   Female   NA   15   KS   Going To School   ---   IA 

 

Source Information:

  Census Place Belvue, Pottawatomie, Kansas

  Family History Library Film   1254393

  NA Film Number   T9-0393

  Page Number   368B

 

This time Victoria is remarried and Margaret is a widow and Mary is now called Muller!!!

 

 

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

2.  CATHERINE2 MULLER (PETER1) (Source: Katherines obit.) was born Abt. 1818 in Illinois, and died April 29, 1881 in Council Bluffs, Potawatamie, Iowa (Source: Obit.).  She married STUTELY E WICKS (Source: History of Geauga Ohio.) October 25, 1835 in Council Bluffs, Iowa or Chicago, Illinois, son of OBED WICKS and SABRA ELLIS.  He was born Bet. 1810 - 1814 in Watertown, New York, and died September 22, 1865 in Soda Springs, Utah Territory (Source: Stutley Wicks obit.).

 

Notes for CATHERINE MULLER:

Council Bluffs, Iowa obit May 1, 1881

  WICKS-In Council Bluffs, Iowa, Friday, April 29, 1881. Katherine Wicks, wife of S.E. Wicks, aged 63 years.

   The deceased was an old resident of Council Bluffs, having come to this city with her husband in 1835. She has been a sufferer from inflammatory rheumatism for the past six years.

   The funeral will take place this (Sunday) afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Catholic church. Friends and family are invited to attend.

****************************

TREATY WITH THE CHIPPEWA, ETC. September 26, 1833 Proclaimed February 21, 1835 (see notes on son in law for full details)

One hundred thousand dollars to satisfy sundry individuals, in behalf of whom reservations were asked, which the Commissioners refused to grant: and also to indemnify the Chippewa tribe who are parties to this treaty for certain lands along the shore of Lake Michigan, to which they make claim, which have been ceded to the United States by the Menominee Indians--the manner in which the same is to be paid is set forth in Schedule "A" hereunto annexed.

SCHEDULE "A"

(Referred to in the Treaty, containing the sums payable to Individuals in lieu of Reservations.)

Alexander Muller, Gholson Kercheval, trustee 800

Paschal Muller, do. do. [do. is short for ditto; one is under "Gholson Kercheval," the other under "trustee".] 800

Margaret Muller 200

Socra Muller 200

___________________________________________

from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net

may have a new clue as to Katherines family

she says Alexander was born about 1819 and died after 1880 near Muskogee, In Terr

she lists that in 1863 he is listed on a Potawatomi Tribal Roll and that he lived with his daughter Margaret Ellen and her spouce when he died.

________________________________________

The 1850 census gives her place of birth "Macknaw Isle", after doing some digging I discovered that Mackinac Island is an island that is

8 1/2 miles around off the coast of Michigan, talked to the city clerk whos family originated there (she was Sioux) and she explained that the Potowatomi and many other tribes were there she said it is very possible that Katherines father was a fur trader who traded at John Aston's place and that may be why Katherine was born there, she stated that after the war of 1812 the Natives were pushed off to the center of the island called the villiage...she also suggested that I call the Catholic church on the island. Talked to the Church said I need to send a letter before August.

_____________________________________

On November 18, 1868 Catherine Muller got $610.59 at the Pottawatomie Agency Kansas for becoming a citizen of the United states...her brother Alexander got the same on the same date

 

 

___________________________________________

The1842 Potawatamie Indian of Council Bluffs Pay Roll for "Half Breeds"

 

Notes:

 

This annuity roll is found on "Iowa Territorial Papers", National Archives Microcopy No. 325, Roll 78, blip 534. This particular pay roll differentiates each of the tribal bands living there. Blips 534, 535 and 536 begin by showing "Wau-bon-see's Band" and ends by showing "Half Breeds". The following names come from the latter enumeration.

 

The following list includes: Name, # males under 10 years, males between 10 and 40, males over 40, females under 10, females between 10 and 40, females over 40.

Catherine Wicks        ...1...0...0...3...1...0

Her brother Paschal is also listed on this roll....interesting that Alexander is not listed there or any other Mullers

 

________________________________________

The 1843 Pay Roll for Potawatomie Annuities at Council Bluffs sub-agency for "Half Breeds"

 

Notes:

 

This annuity roll is found on "Iowa Territorial Papers", National Archives Microcopy No. 325, Roll 78, blip 757. Blip 757 begins the 1843 Chippewa, Ottawa and Potawatomie annuity pay roll prepared by Richard S. Elliott, Council Bluffs sub-agent. This excerpt is pages 18 and 19 of the pay roll.

 

BE CAREFUL: This is NOT a census, but a listing of those persons--and the number in each family--who are of mixed blood living in each family who qualify for an annuity payment as a member of this tribe of Indians. For instance, many husbands, who were not of mixed blood, are not counted.

 

The following list includes: Name, # men over 40 years, men under 40, women over 40, women under 40, children over 10, children under 10.

Catherine Wicks         ...0...0...0...1...0...4

This one both Paschal and Alexander is on

 

More About CATHERINE MULLER:

Burial: St. Joseph's (Catholic) Cem., Council Bluffs, Potawatamie, Iowa

Cause of Death: inflamitory rhematism (Source: Gordon's ancestors.FTW, Date of Import: May 10, 2000.)

 

Notes for STUTELY E WICKS:

The 1860 census for Kane Township, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, call number 338.  Page 361, dwelling no. 464, family 407 showed:

Stutely E Wicks, 48, M, Farmer and Miller, real estate worth $7000, birthplace New York

Catherine Wicks, 46, F, Housewife, birthplace Michigan

Alcina S., 23, F, Housework, Iowa

Almira C., 23, F, Housework, Iowa

Rosena A., 20, F, Housework, Iowa

John N., 18, M, Milller, Iowa

Julia A., 16, F, Housework, Iowa

George W., 14, M, Iowa

Joseph S., 11, M, Iowa

Othapilla, 9, F, Iowa

Ada, 3, F, Iowa

Alvin Fleming, 31, M, Indian Trader, New York

______________________________________________________-

  1850 U.S. Census - Iowa

1850 U.S. Census Iowa Pottawattamie District 21

S.E. Wicks, age 35, male, B. New York

Catherine ", age 30, female, B. Macknaw Isle (?)

Almira ", age 13, female, B. Iowa attends school

Alsina ", 13, female, B. Iowa, attends school

Begonia ", age 10, female, B. Iowa, attends school

John ", age 8, male, B. Iowa, attends school

Julliann ", age 6, female, B. Iowa, attends school

George ", age 4, male, B Iowa, attends school

Joseph ", age 3, male, B. Iowa

 

_______________________________________

They came to Council Bluffs in 1835.

*******************

Obituary

Stutely E. Wicks. a citizen of this city, who has been in the gold regions of Montana Territory for the last two years, died on his way home at Soda Springs, Utah Territory, on the 22d day of September, 1865.

Mr. Wicks was an old citizen of this county, having lived here for many years before the Indian title to the lands was extinguished and was well respected by all who knew him.

We understand that he was taken sick in the mountains and through the kindess of John and Lee Clark was conveyed as far as Soda Springs on his way home, where he became so ill that they were forced to leave him in the care of kind friends who did all they could to relieve his sufferings, which continued but

a few days.  He was decently buried near the Springs by the kindness of friends, who took the sick stranger in and administered to his wants, and made his last hours in this world as comfortable as their circumstances would permit.

Council Bluffs (IA) Bugle, Thursday, 9 November 1865

*************************

From Garner Township From the 1882 and 1907 Pottawattamie County Histories:

Garner township was settled mainly by the Mormons in 1846, long before township lines began to form. The early inhabitants chose the site because of the mill which had been built in 1836 along the banks of the Mosquito Creek by the Government for the benefit of the Pottawattamie Indians. Stutely E. Wicks was the last government agent who ran the mill, and when the Indians were removed to the reservation granted them in Kansas, the old mill was unneeded as government property, and Mr. Wicks remained in undisputed possession.

The mill, located on the bank of the stream, promised the best facilities for getting what the settlers needed to survive, -- a little corn meal. Wicks Mills as it was commonly known, was but a poor affair at best and the settlers were unable to get any grinding done save at such times as the Indians were not needing the mill. Little else was ground except corn as grain of all other kinds was very scarce. There was also a saw mill attached to the Indian Mill, which was rigged with an old-fashioned up-and-down saw, or what was usually called a sash saw. The sawing and grinding were both done by the same water wheel.

The old Indian mill was run until 1849, when Mr. Wicks built a new mill beside it and used the old machinery. In 1851, this mill was damaged by high water, but was repaired and kept running until 1863, when it tumbled down by reason of the water having washed away the foundation.

The vicinity of the old Wicks mill for more than half a century played a conspicuous part in the early history of Pottawattamie County. It was here where the immigrants obtained their first flour and corn meal, and later, for many years, it was the place where the Latter Day Saints held their yearly meetings, some coming for nearly one hundred miles. A beautiful grove furnished an ideal camping ground, and the Mosquito creek, like the Jordan, became famous for the number baptized in its waters. Alongside the road coming from under a bluff was an excellent spring capable of supplying any number of worshippers, and nearby was a little schoolhouse where young Kinsman taught and from where he used to write interesting letters to the Nonpareil. Little did anyone think at that time of the noble part he was soon to play and the fame he would soon achieve by his heroic death near Vicksburg.

****************************

From Council Bluffs History, written by Charles Babbitt-September 1925.

"Pottowattamie, Chippewa, and Ottawa Indians located in the area....The leaders among the Cheiftains were Billy Caldwell, Joseph Laframboise, Bigfoot, and Wabaunsee, the latter being the eldest warrior of the Pottowattamie. Caldwell who appeared to be the dominant cheif located his band near the blockhouse (located on the left bank of the Missouri River 15-18 miles above the mouth of the great Platte River) a 20ft square structure was errected to keep them safe from the Souix. Caldwells Indian name was Sagaunash (Means Englishman) is said to be the offspring of an Irish officer in the British service and a Pottowattamie woman."

   "There came with the Indians a member of Caldwells band, a white man named Stutely E. Wicks, known in frontier parlance as a "Squaw Man" because of his marriage to an Indian woman. He was born of pure New England heritage at Watertown, New York, in 1810 or 1811. At an early age he went to the vicinity of Chicago and there joined the Prairie Band of the Pottawattamie Indians. On October 25, 1835 he married Catherine Muller, a mixed blood, and became a full member of the tribe with which he migrated to Southwestern Iowa in 1837."

   "He was an expert miller and tradition says he was employed at the mill from the very beginning of its operation by each successive officially designated miller, and that he in conjunction with his father-in-law, a proffesional Wheelwright, ran the mill up to the appointment of Owen. Immediately upon assuming control, Owen discharged Wicks and unsuccesfully sought possesion of the millers dwelling, occupied by the latter. Wicks denied him possesion claiming he built the house with his own money. In 1848 Wicks went to St. Louis and obtained from the superintendant of Indian affairs an order telling Owen to lease to Wicks. On October 1st, Wicks took full possesion of the mill and operated it as a private enterprise (Council Bluffs was called Kanesville until 1853)"

   "In 1853 the land was put up for auction to the public because the Indians had moved and Wicks was not entitled to it because of his ties with the Pottawattomies and he did not want to sever his Indian connections, he had an employee buy it for him and on June 18th, 1853 this employee transfered it back to Wicks (George Schofield). It was disputed but later dropped. In April 1862 the mill was damaged by flood. Wicks then moved to the mining (1864) regions of Montana and Idaho He became sick and started to return to his home, but died of pnuemonia on the way in late 1865 and was buried by his companions in the mountains not far from the sight of the Custer battlefield."

**********************

Wicks left Catherine to run the mill when he went to Montana

********************** 

Stuteley is living in Kanesville in 1850. He is listed as S.E. in the census Index for Iowa. His brother is living in the same town but no other wicks are listed living there. Not even Catherine or the children. Either they are living with their mother on the reservation or they are just not counted because they were natives.

*************************

From

THE TREATY WITH THE POTAWATOMI NATION

June 5 and 17, 1846

Stutely Wicks was a witness and listed in the same treaty is Paskel Miller-I wonder if this is the same as Paschal Muller

TREATY WITH THE POTAWATOMI NATION

 

                                    June 5 and 17, 1846

 

                                   Ratified July 22, 1846

                                 Proclaimed July 23, 1846

Whereas the various bands of the Pottowautomi Indians, known as the Chippewas, Ottawas, and Pottowautomies, the Pottowautomies of the Prairie, the Pottowautomies of the Wabash, and the Pottowautomies of Indiana, have, subsequent to the year 1828, entered into separate and distinct treaties with the United States, by which they have been separated and located in different countries, and difficulties have arisen as to the proper distribution of the stipulations under various treaties, and being the same people by kindred, by feeling, and by language, and having, in former periods, lived on and owned

their lands in common; and being desirous to unite in one common country, and again become one people, and receive their annuities and other benefits in common, and to abolish all minor distinctions of bands by which they have heretofore been divided, and are anxious to be known only as the Pottowautomie Nation, thereby reinstating the national character; and Whereas the United States are also anxious to restore and concentrate said tribes to a state so desirable and necessary for the happiness of their people, as well as to enable the Government to arrange and manage its intercourse with them:

Now, therefore, the United States and the said Indians do hereby agree that said people shall hereafter be known as a nation, to be called the Pottowautomie Nation; and to the following

      Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Agency on the Missouri River, near Council Bluffs, on the fifth day of June, and at Pottawatomie Creek, near the Osage River, south and west of the State of Missouri, on the seventeenth day of the same month, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, between T. P. Andrews, Thomas H. Harvey, and Gideon C. Matlock, commissioners on the part of the United States, on the one part, and  the various bands of the Pottowautomie, Chippewas, and Ottowas Indians on the other part:

ARTICLE 1. It is solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship which so happily exist between the people of the United States and the Pottowautomie Indians shall continue forever; the said tribes of Indians giving assurance, hereby, of fidelity and friendship to the Government and people of the United States; and the United States giving, at the same time, promise of all proper care and parental protection.

ARTICLE 2. The said tribes of Indians hereby agree to sell and cede, and do hereby sell and cede, to the United States, all the lands to which they have claim of any kind whatsoever, and especially the tracts or parcels of lands ceded to them by the treaty of Chicago, and subsequent thereto, and now, in whole or in part, possessed by their people, lying and being north of the river Missouri, and embraced in the limits of

the Territory of Iowa; and also all that tract of country lying and being on or near the Osage River, and west of the State of Missouri; it being understood that these cessions are not to affect the title of said Indians to any grants or reservations made to them by former treaties.

ARTICLE 3. In consideration of the foregoing cessions or sales of land to the United States, it is agreed to pay to said tribes of Indians the sum of eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars, subject to the conditions, deductions, and liabilities provided for in the subsequent articles of this treaty.

ARTICLE 4. The United States agree to grant to the said united tribes of Indians possession and title to a tract or parcel of land containing five hundred and seventy-six thousand acres, being thirty miles square, and being the eastern part of the lands ceded to the United States by the Kansas tribe of Indians, by treaty concluded on the 14th day of January, and ratified on the 15th of April of the present year, lying adjoining

the Shawnees on the south, and the Delawares and Shawnees on the east, on both sides of the Kansas River, and to guarantee the full and complete possession of the same to the Pottowautomie Nation, parties to this treaty, as their land and home forever; for which they are to pay the United States the sum of eighty-seven thousand dollars, to be deducted from the gross sum promised to them in the 3d article of this treaty.

ARTICLE 5. The United States agree to pay said nation of Indians, at the first annuity payment after the ratification of this treaty, and after an appropriation shall have been made by Congress, the sum of fifty thousand dollars, out of the aggregate sum granted in the third article of this treaty to enable said Indians to arrange their affairs, and pay their just debts, before leaving their present homes; to pay for their improvements; to purchase wagons horses, and other means of transportation, and pay individuals for the loss of property necessarily sacrificed in moving to their new homes; said sum to be paid, in open council, by the proper agents of the United States, and in such just proportions to each band as the President of the United States may direct.

ARTICLE 6. The said tribes of Indians agree to remove to their new homes on the Kansas River, within two years from the ratification of this treaty; and further agree to set apart the sum of twenty thousand dollars to the upper bands, (being ten dollars per head,) and ten thousand dollars to the lower bands (being five dollars per head,) to pay the actual expenses of removing; and the sum of forty thousand dollars for all the bands, as subsistence money, for the first twelve months after their arrival at their new homes; to be paid to them so soon as their arrival at their new homes is made known to the Government, and convenient arrangements can be made to pay the same between the parties to this treaty; the aforesaid sums to be also deducted from the aggregate sum granted by the United States to said tribes of Indians by the 3d article of this treaty.

ARTICLE 7. The balance of the said sum of eight hundred fifty thousand dollars after deducting the cost of removal and subsistence, &c., it is agreed shall remain with the United States, in trust for said Indians, and an interest of five per cent. annually paid thereon, commencing at the expiration of one year after the removal of said Indians, and continuing for thirty years, and until the nation shall be reduced below one thousand souls. If, after the expiration of thirty years, or any period thereafter, it shall be ascertained that the nation is reduced below that number, the said annuity shall thenceforth be paid pro rata so long as they shall exist as a separate and distinct nation, in proportion as the present number shall bear to the number then in existence.

ARTICLE 8. It is agreed upon by the parties to this treaty that, after the removal of the Pottowautomie Nation to the Kansas country, the annual interest of their "improvement fund" shall be paid out promptly and fully, for their benefit at their new homes. If, however, at any time thereafter, the President of the United States shall be of opinion that it would be advantageous to the Pottowautomie Nation, and they should request the same to be done, to pay them the interest of said money in lieu of the employment of

persons or purchase of machines or implements, he is hereby authorized to pay the same, or any part thereof, in money, as their annuities are paid at the time of the general payments of annuities. It is also agreed that, after the expiration of two years from the ratification of this treaty, the school-fund of the Pottowautomies shall be expended entirely in their own country, unless their people, in council, should, at any time, express a desire to have any part of the same expended in a different manner.

ARTICLE 9. It is agreed by the parties to this treaty that the buildings occupied as a missionary establishment, including twenty acres of land now under fence, shall be reserved for the use of the Government agency; also the houses used for blacksmith house and shop shall be reserved for the use of the Pottowautomie smith; but should the property cease to be used for the aforementioned purposes, then it shall revert to the use of the Pottowautomie Nation,

ARTICLE 10. It is agreed that hereafter there shall be paid to the Pottowautomie Nation, annually, the sum of three hundred dollars, in lieu of the two thousand pounds of tobacco, fifteen hundred pounds of iron, and three hundred and fifty pounds of steel, stipulated to be paid to the Pottowautomies under the third article of the treaty of September 20, 1828.

In testimony whereof, T. P. Andrews, Thomas H. Harvey, and Gideon C. Matlock, aforesaid Commissioners, and the Chiefs and Principal Men of the Pottowautomie, Ottowa, and Chippewas tribes of Indians, have set their hands, at the time and place first mentioned.

 

                                                T. P. Andrews,

                                                Th. H. Harvey,

                                                G. C. Matlock,

 

                                                     Commissioners.

 

 

Mi-au-mise, (the Young Miami,)

Op-te-gee-shuck, (or Half Day,)

Wa-sow-o-ko-uck, (or the Lightning,)

Kem-me-kas, (or Bead,)

Mi-quess, (or the Wampum,)

Wab-na-ne-me, or White Pigeon,

Na-no-no-uit, (or Like the Wind,)

Patt-co-shuck, junior,

Catte-nab-mee, (the Close Observer,)

Wap-que-shuck, (or White Cedar,)

Sah-ken-na-ne-be,

Etwa-gee-shuck,

Saass-pucks-kum, (or Green Leaf,)

Ke-wa-ko-to, (Black Claud Turning,)

Meek-sa-mack, (the Wampum,)

Chau-cose, (Little Crane,)

Co-shae-wais, (Tree Top,)

Patt-qui,

Me-shuk-to-no,

Ween-co,

Joseph Le Frambeau, Interpreter,

Pierre or Perish Le Clark,

M. B. Beaubien, Interpreter,

Ca-ta-we-num, (the Black Dog,)

Sine-pe-num,

Chatt-tee, (the Pelican,)

Me-shik-ke-an,

Teh-cah-co, (Spotted Fawn,)

Ca-shaw-kee, (the Craw Fish,)

Shem-me-nah,

Pes-co-unk, (Distant Thunder,)

Naut-wish-cum,

Ob-nob, (or He Looks Back,)

Pam-wa-mash-kuck,

Pacq-qui-pa-chee,

Ma-shaus, (the Cutter,)

Ci-co,

Puck-quon, (or the Rib,)

Sena-tche-wan, (or Swift Current,)

Shaub-poi-tuck, (the Man goes through,)

Wab-sai, (or White Skin,)

Shaum-num-teh, (or Medicine Man,)

Nah-o-sah, (the Walker,)

Keahh,

Ne-ah-we-quot, (the Four Faces,)

Wa-sash-kuck, (or the Grass Turner,)

Ke-ton-ne-co, (or the Kidneys,)

*Francois Bourbonnai,

*Chas. H. Beaubien,

*Shau-on-nees,

*Paskal Miller,

*Joseph Glaudeau,

*Joseph Laughton,

Nah-kee-shuck, (In the Air,)

Mich-e-wee-tah, (Bad Name,)

Patte-co-to,

Shaw-bon-ni-agh,

Kah-bon-cagh,

Wock-quet.

 

Witnesses.

 

R. B. Mitchell, Indian sub-agent,

Richard Pearson,

A. G. Wilson,

S. W. Smith,

Edward Pore,

John H. Whitehead,

John Copeland,

T. D. S. McDonnell,

W. R. English,

S. E. Wicks,  **************************

Lewis Kennedy,

L. T. Tate.

 

 

(To the names of the Indians, except where there is an asterisk, are added their marks.)

We, the undersigned, Chiefs and Head Men, and Representatives of the Wabash, St. Joseph, and Prairie bands of the Ottowa, Chippewas, and Pottowautomie Indians, do hereby accept, ratify, and confirm the foregoing articles of a treaty, in all particulars. Done at Pottowautomie Creek, near the Osage River, west and south of the State of Missouri, this seventeenth day of June, A. D., 1846.

 

To-pen-e-be,

We-we-say,

Gah-gah-amo,

I-o-way,

Mah-go-quick,

Zhah-wee,

Louison,

Mash-kum-me,

Crane,

Esk-bug-ge,

Noa-ah-kye,

Abraham Burnet,

Ma-gis-gize,

Nas-wah-gay,

Pok-to,

Little Bird,

Shim-nah,

Ma-kda-wah,

Black Wolf,

Root,

Niena-kto,

Ma-je-sah,

Mah-suck,

Bade-je-zha,

Kah-shqua,

Little American,

Match-kay,

Wane-mage,

Wah-wah-suck 2d,

Black Bird,

Wah-wah-suck 1st,

Wab-mack, (Henry Clay,)

T-buck-ke,

Zah-gna,

N. D. Grover,

Big Snake,

En-ne-byah,

Jau-ge-mage,

Sin-be-nim,

No-clah-Koshig,

Os-me-at,

Wah-bah-koze,

I-o-wa 2d,

Wah-we-sueah,

Mowa,

Moses H. Scott,

Kah-kee,

Andrew Jackson,

Ke-sis,

Pame-qe-yah,

Peme-nuek,

Be-to-quah,

Mesha-de,

Wm. Hendricks,

Nma-quise,

Mas-co,

Peter Moose,

Kah-dot,

Za-k-ta,

Ah-bdah-sqa,

Wah-nuck-ke ,

Wah-be-een-do,

At-yah-she,

Qua-qua-tah,

Nah-nim-muck-shuck,

Antoine,

No-zha-kum,

Na-che-wa,

Ahn-quot,

*Jos. N. Bourassa,

Kka-mage,

*Jude W. Bourassa,

Bossman,

Joel Barrow.

 

(To the names of the Indians, except where there is an asterisk, are added their marks.)

 

Witnesses.

Joseph Bertrand, Jr.,

R. W. Cummins, Indian Agent,

Leonidas A. Vaughan,

Robert Simerwell,

Thomas Hurlburt,

J. W. Polk,

J. Lykins,

M. H. Scott,

Washn. Bossman,

John T. Jones,

James A. Poage,

Joseph Clymer, Jr.,

W. W. Cleghorn.

 

Sources:

Fay, George E., ed. Treaties Between the Potawatomi Tribe of Indians and the United States of America, 1789 - 1867. Greeley, Colorado, University of Northern Colorado, 1971.

Kappler, Charles J., ed. Indian Treaties 1778-1883. Mattituck, New York, Amereon House, 1972.

*****************************

Early Days at Council Bluffs,

Stutely E. Wicks became owner of the mill after the Pottawattamies left the vicinity. (See Cash Entry No. 184, Kanesville series, May 31, 1854, in General Land Office files, Washington, D.C.)

______________________________________

I am a great-great-great grand daughter of Catherine and Stutely Wicks. I did not know her name was Muller but am very excited to get her last name. Their oldest daugthers were twins, Alcina and Almira. Almira is my great-great grandmother; she was born in Council Bluff, Iowa when Catherine and Stutely moved there with the tribe. Almira and her brother John later moved to Kansas with the tribe and Almira later came to Oklahoma and received allotments with her children. Stutely (born 1812, New York) and Catherine Wicks (born 1814, Michigan) are listed in the 1860 Pottawattamie Co, Iowa census with their children and it states that Catherine was born in Michigan. Thanks for the information, Sheila Jones

_________________________________________

 

 Notes from Vincent Correll

1834 Stutely E. Weeks reports that he has lived among the Pottawatomy Indians since November 29, 1834 [National Archives Microfilm Pub #234, letters received by the office of Indian affairs 1824-1881 roll 216, council bluffs agency, 1836-1857

 

1835 Stutely Weeks reports that he was regularly married by a Justice of the Peace of what was then Cook County, IL, on October 25, 1835 to Catherine Muller, a half breed Pottawatomy woman

National archives microfilm Pub. #234 film 216

 

1837 Stutley Weeks reports (in 1844) that he arrived in the Council Bluffs Sub agency on Aug 15, 1837, and has since resided there with his family. [and he] was employed at times as Chief of the United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa & Pottaweatomis to transact business for them

National Archives Microfilm 234, roll 216

                           

 _______________________

This is from a book about the Bluffs near Council Bluffs

 http://www.nps.gov/mwro/loesshills/AppC.pdf.

In 1833 the U.S. government relocated the Potowatomis,38 approximately 2,000 in number, from

Illinois to southwest Iowa. The largest village was near modern Council Bluffs, with smaller villages

farther south. The Potowatomis lived primarily by hunting the game-laden Loess Hills, gathering

native plants and planting small gardens. Periods of poor hunting and attacks by their northern Siouan

neighbors resulted in hard times. Drunkenness encouraged by the white traders did not help (Mutel

1989a).

The first permanent white settler of the region was Major Stephen Cooper, an Indian agent who

settled a farmstead four miles southwest of modern Sidney in 1836. Similarly, the first Euro-

American settlers in Pottawattamie County were David Hardin, a farmer, and Stutely Wicks, a miller,

who came in 1838 on behest of the federal government to train the area Indians in their trades (Dodge

193239 and Tostevin 1870). That same year, an outbreak of cholera decimated native tribes in the area

(Van der Zee 1913). Other white settlers trickled into the Loess Hills area in the late 1830s and early

1840s.

38 Originally from southern Michigan, the Potowatomis were forced to move several times, first to Ohio, then Illinois, on to Iowa, and finally Kansas and Oklahoma. Waubonsie, Chief of the Potowatomis, was born in Ohio and was forced to move with his tribe to northern Illinois. In 1833, the Potowatomis ceded their lands east of the Mississippi River in exchange for an area in southwestern Iowa. The tribe was moved again, this time to an area between modern Sidney and Glenwood.

When the Iowa/Missouri border question was settled, the Potowatomis south of the boundary were relocated out of Missouri into Mills and Fremont Counties in western Iowa (Blackburn personal communication; Mutel 1989b). When Iowas bid for statehood required the cession of all lands held by Native Americans in 1846, Waubonsie negotiated a two-year reprieve for his people, and permission for the aging Chief to remain in Iowa. Waubonsies gravesite in Lyons Township, Mills County is privately owned and unavailable to the public.

39 Dodge incorrectly fixed the date at 1828.   

    

 

 

More About STUTELY E WICKS:

Census: 1860, Pottawattamie Co, Kane Twp, Iowa (Source: 1860 Iowa census.)

 

More About STUTELY WICKS and CATHERINE MULLER:

Marriage: October 25, 1835, Council Bluffs, Iowa or Chicago, Illinois

     

Children of CATHERINE MULLER and STUTELY WICKS are:

4.                i.       ALMIRA KATHERINE3 WICKS, b. September 13, 1836, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa; d. January 09, 1896, Oklahoma.

5.               ii.       ELSINA SABREY WICKS, b. September 16, 1836, Council Bluffs, Potawattamie County, Iowa; d. June 25, 1912, Nebraska City, Otoe County, Nebraska.

6.              iii.       ROSINE A. WICKS, b. May 1843, Council Bluffs, Potawattamie County, Iowa; d. Aft. 1920, California.

7.             iv.       JOHN N. WICKS, b. 1842, Council Bluffs, Potawattamie County, Iowa; d. April 23, 1928, Council Bluffs, Potawatamie County, Iowa.

8.              v.       JULIA ANN WICKS, b. 1844, Council Bluffs, Iowa; d. 1884, Council Bluffs, Potawatamie, Iowa.

9.             vi.       GEORGE W. WICKS, b. February 1845, Council Bluffs, Potawattamie County, Iowa.

                vii.       CATHERINE WICKS, b. Abt. 1847; m. SAMUEL KINGSLAND, September 07, 1867, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa (Source: LDS.); b. Abt. 1809.

 

Notes for CATHERINE WICKS:

I am not sure I believe that Samuel Kingsland married this Catherine Wicks, from looking at census records, Samuels wife Kate was 10 years younger than Dr. Kingsland, but I did find this record at LDS:

CATHERINE WICKS 

  Female 

Event(s):

 Birth: 

 Christening: 

 Death:     

 

 Burial: 

 

Marriages:

  Spouse:  SAMUEL KINGSLAND  Family

  Marriage:  07 SEP 1867   , Pottawattamie, Iowa

 

This is all I have to go on but our Catherine would be about 30 years younger than Dr. Kingsland, unless he had a son by the same name....still looking

 

 

 

Notes for SAMUEL KINGSLAND:

Census_Year  1870

Microfilm #  M593-416

State        IA

County       Pottawattamie

Division     Kane Twp, 3rd Ward / P. O. Council Bluffs

In the 1870 Council Bluffs Census

S Kingsland age 61, Physician b. New York

kate Kingsland age 51, keeps house, born Michigan

SK Kingsland age 17 male born in Illinois

and Ada Wicks, age 13 born in Iowa all live together

____________________________

Given: Samuel

Iowa State Census 1885

Surname: Kingsland

Location: Fifth Avenue & First Street

Age: 75

Sex: M

Marital Status: M

Birth State: NY

Entitled to Vote: X

Infirmities: Blind

Line Number: 28

Dwelling Number: 192

Family Number: 188

Page Number: 252

State: IA

County: Mills

Township Name: Malvern

Town: Malvern

Family History Film: 1021498

Volume: 233

with

Given: Elizabeth

Surname: Kingsland

Location: Fifth Avenue & First Street

Age: 70

Sex: F

Marital Status: M

Birth Country: England

Father's Nativity: F

Mother's Nativity: F

Can Read but Can't Write: X

Infirmities: Deaf

Line Number: 29

Dwelling Number: 192

Family Number: 188

Page Number: 252

State: IA

County: Mills

Township Name: Malvern

Town: Malvern

Family History Film: 1021498

Volume: 233

 

More About SAMUEL KINGSLAND and CATHERINE WICKS:

Marriage: September 07, 1867, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa (Source: LDS.)

 

               viii.       JOSEPH S. WICKS, b. 1849, Council Bluffs, Potawattamie County, Iowa (Source: LDS.).

                 ix.       OTHAPILLA WICKS, b. 1851, Council Bluffs, Potawattamie County, Iowa (Source: LDS.).

                  x.       ADA WICKS, b. 1857, Council Bluffs, Potawattamie County, Iowa (Source: LDS.).

 

Notes for ADA WICKS:

In the 1870 Iowa census, Ada was living in Kane Twp with the Kingsland Family.

S. Kingsland   age 61  m     physician     born NY

Kate "               "    51  f                           "     MI

S.K.  "               "    17  m                                 IL

Ada Wicks       "     13  f                                IA

L. Lark                    22 m                               IA

M.A. Cox                 27 m                               OH

Anna Garding          28 f                                 WY

Mar Wilson             29 m                               NY

Her sister Catherine married samuel Kingsland.

 

 

More About ADA WICKS:

Census: 1870, Potawattamie County, Iowa, Council Bluffs page # 057

 

 

 

 

3.  ALEXANDER2 MULLER (PETER1) (Source: allotments from 1867.) was born Abt. 1819 in Michigan (Source: (1) from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net., (2) 1870 Kansas Census.), and died 1890 (Source: Kay Anderson.).  He married (1) ELIZA JANE HUFFMAN (Source: from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net.) June 11, 1846 (Source: Melissa Cryer cryer15@bellsouth.net.).  She was born Abt. 1829 (Source: Uniontown Cemetery, Willard, Kansas.), and died December 13, 1867 in Uniontown cemetery, Willard, Kansas (Source: Uniontown Cemetery, Willard, Kansas.).  He married (2) MISSAQUIQUI Bef. 1844.    He married (3) CHEE CHEE (Source: from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net.) Aft. 1867 in Kansas (Source: from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net.). 

 

Notes for ALEXANDER MULLER:

On November 18, 1868 Alexander Muller got $610.59 at the Pottawatomie Agency Kansas for becoming a citizen of the United states...his sister Catherine got the same on the same date

______________________________________________________

from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net

ID: I08718

Name: Alexander MULLER 1

Sex: M

Birth: 1819 in ? 1

Death: AFT. 1880 in Near Muskogee, IN Terr 1

Fact 6: On 1863 Potawatomi Tribal Roll 1

Fact 7: Lived with Theodore & Maggie at time of death 1

Burial: AFT. 1880 Near Muskogee, I.T. 1

 

Marriage 1 Eliza Jane HUFFMAN b: 1827 in ?

Married: ABT. 1845 in ? 1

Children

 Margaret Ellen MULLER b: 1853 in Iowa

_____________________________________________

Found this in the LDS

ALEXANDER MULLER 

  Male

Other:  26 SEP 1833   Chippewa Tribe, Chicago, Cook, Illinois

Must be the treaty that was signed as Paschal is also listed here as other on the same date

______________________________________

Census Microfilm Records: Iowa, 1860

Age:  38    

Gender:  M    

Race:  W    

Birthplace:  IL    

State:  Iowa    

County:  HARRISON    

Locale:  MAGNOLIA TWP    

Series:  M653    

Roll:  323    

Part:  1    

Page:  805    

Alexander Muller, age 38, miller, B Illinois

Eliza ", age 25, B Canada West

Brigham ", age 11, B IA

George H ", age 10, B IA

William ", age 5, B IA

Margaret ", age 4, B IA

Minerva ", age 4/12, Iowa

 

_____________________________________

MULLER, ALEXANDER

  State: KS Year: 1870

  County: Wabaunsee County Record Type: Federal Population Schedule /

  Township: Newburg Township Page: 278

  Database: KS 1870 Federal Census Index

 

Muller, Alexander, age 50, male, white, farmer, 600-200, B. Michigan, he cannot write, can vote

" Margaret, age 23, female, white, keeps house, B. Illinois

" Brigham, age 21, male, white, Laborer, B. Iowa, cannot write, can vote

" George, age 19, male, white, Laborer, B. Iowa, cannot write

" William, age 16, male, white, Laborer, B. Iowa, cannot write

" Margaret, age 13, female, white, B. Iowa, cannot write

" Mary, age 5, female, white, B. Iowa

__________________

I cannot find any of these Mullers in the 1880 census, did they move back onto the reservation?

_______________________

Notes from Kay Anderson:

"Alex was in Council Bluffs, IA on August 15, 1837, as he is listed with others in a deposition regarding horses that were stolen from them. Also he had a sister, Catherine, who married Stanley Weeks on October 25, 1835 in Cook County, IL. Alex also had a brother, Paschal, age 45, listed on the 1836 roll and was listed on the 1863 roll as being 1/2 Potawatomi and maybe Chipewa"

Fernand Bourassa writes that Margaret Ellen Muller's parents are Alex and Missaquiqui

 

______________________________

The 1843 Pay Roll for Potawatomie Annuities at Council Bluffs sub-agency for "Half Breeds"

 

Notes:

 

This annuity roll is found on "Iowa Territorial Papers", National Archives Microcopy No. 325, Roll 78, blip 757. Blip 757 begins the 1843 Chippewa, Ottawa and Potawatomie annuity pay roll prepared by Richard S. Elliott, Council Bluffs sub-agent. This excerpt is pages 18 and 19 of the pay roll.

 

BE CAREFUL: This is NOT a census, but a listing of those persons--and the number in each family--who are of mixed blood living in each family who qualify for an annuity payment as a member of this tribe of Indians. For instance, many husbands, who were not of mixed blood, are not counted.

 

The following list includes: Name, # men over 40 years, men under 40, women over 40, women under 40, children over 10, children under 10.

Alexander Muller        ...0...1...0...0...0...0

Catherine and Paschal are listed here as well

____________________________

From Wisconsin Fur-Trade People, p. 234: "When Indian treaties were announced, the traders would claim payments for the credits that they had given to the Indians which were never repaid.  There cash payments under a treaty with the CHIPPEWA Indians of Chicago and Milwaukee in 1833; traders from every part of Wisconsin made their claims.   In addition, claims were made for mixed-blood offspring.  Fur-trade people and/or their descendants included  Jean Baptiste Miranda; Alexander Muller, Francois Chevalier,  Antoine LeClare, Elroy Bourassa, Daniel Bourassa,  Antoine Ouilmet, Laurant Fortier, Jacques Chappue, Roscum, Francois Bourbannais, Sr. and Jr., Jean baptiste Cloutier,  Claude Laframboise, Alexander Robinson,  Billy Caldwell, Medard Beaubien,  John K. Clark, Solomon Juneau, Alexis Bailley, Stephan Mack, Jean Baptiste Rabbie, Francois Chevalier, William Brunett,  Isadore Chabert, Luther Rice,  Pierre Carbonneau, Pierre Chalifoux, Joseph Laframboise,  Jean Baptiste Letendre, Bernard Grignon, Jacques Porlier, Jacques Vieau,  Schindler, Joseph Dailly, John Lawe, Louise Grignon, Paul Grignon, Amable Grignon, Perish Grignon,  Robert Grignon, Thomas Conner, Pierre Duvernay, Joshua Boyd, Joseph Bailly,  James Kinzie, R. A. Forsyth, Gabriel Godfroy, Thomas R. Covill, George Hunt, Joseph Chaunier, John and Mark Noble and Alexis Provanselle.    The American Fur Company received, for their share of unsatisfied credits, the sum of $4000. "

More About William/Billy/SAU-GA-NASH Caldwell, Jr.:

Indian Tribe: Pottawatomi Indian [1/2] & English [1/2]

Occupation: Chief of the Pottawatomit bands at Chicago & Winnebago

 

More About ALEXANDER MULLER:

Burial: North of Muskogee (Source: Vincent Correll.)

Census: 1860, Iowa

 

Notes for ELIZA JANE HUFFMAN:

Buried in Uniontown Cemetery, near Willard, KS. Headstone is about 25 feet east of the Bourassa enclosure. Stone is down. Eliza Jane's tombstone reads that she was 38 years old at the time of death. Listed on the 1863 Roll as being 1/2 Potawatomie"

I spoke to a local business man who went to the cemetery for me. The headstone reads...

"Eliza Jane

Wife of Alex. Muller

Died Dec. 13, 1867

age 38 years"

 

More About ALEXANDER MULLER and ELIZA HUFFMAN:

Marriage 1: June 11, 1846 (Source: Melissa Cryer cryer15@bellsouth.net.)

Marriage 2: Bet. June 11, 1841 - 1846 (Source: Kay Anderson/Cari Orr.)

Marriage 3: Abt. 1845 (Source: from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net.)

 

More About ALEXANDER MULLER and MISSAQUIQUI:

Marriage: Bef. 1844

 

More About ALEXANDER MULLER and CHEE CHEE:

Marriage: Aft. 1867, Kansas (Source: from ancestry...Janet Serio jsmcewen@att.net.)

     

Children of ALEXANDER MULLER and ELIZA HUFFMAN are:

                   i.       MARGARET3 MULLER (Source: Nancy Spencer spencergenealogy@comcast.net.), b. 1844 (Source: Nancy Spencer spencergenealogy@comcast.net.).

10.             ii.       JAMES BRIGHAM MULLER, b. June 1850, Iowa; d. 1924.

11.            iii.       GEORGE HENRY MULLER, b. 1853; d. February 02, 1906, Wanette, Oklahoma.

12.           iv.       WILLIAM A. MULLER, b. April 02, 1854, Iowa; d. June 25, 1947, Oklahoma.

13.            v.       MARGARET ELLEN MULLER, b. May 16, 1856, Iowa; d. March 21, 1927, Wanette, Pottawatomie County, OK.

                 vi.       MINERVA MULLER (Source: Nancy Spencer spencergenealogy@comcast.net.), b. 1860 (Source: Nancy Spencer spencergenealogy@comcast.net.).

 

Notes for MINERVA MULLER:

Not found in 1880 census

 

                vii.       MARY MULLER (Source: Nancy Spencer spencergenealogy@comcast.net.), b. 1865 (Source: Nancy Spencer spencergenealogy@comcast.net.).

 

Notes for MARY MULLER:

This is our Mary but is it Alexander's daughter? The date matches....

Household:

 

 Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace

 Frank WILLMOTT   Self   M   Male   W   64   IL   Farmer   IL   CANADA 

 Victoria M. WILLMOTT   Wife   M   Female   NA   58   IL   Keeping House   IL   IL 

 Margeret PLEMANDON   Other   W   Female   NA   35   IA      IL   IL 

 Mary MULLER   Other   S   Female   NA   15   KS   Going To School   ---   IA 

 

Source Information:

 1880 Census Place Belvue, Pottawatomie, Kansas

  Family History Library Film   1254393

  NA Film Number   T9-0393

  Page Number   368B

____________________________

There is also a Mary Muller who born in Council Bluffs c 1855 who married a Thomas Wilding in about 1876 in Council Bluffs.

 

 

Generation No. 3

 

4.  ALMIRA KATHERINE3 WICKS (CATHERINE2 MULLER, PETER1) was born September 13, 1836 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa (Source: Sheila Jones.), and died January 09, 1896 in Oklahoma.  She married (1) ALBRECHT WERTH May 22, 1864 in Council Bluffs, Iowa (Source: Sheila Jones.).    She married (2) WILLIAM C. BAYLIS August 02, 1868 in Silverlake, Kansas.  He was born Abt. 1835 in England (Source: 1880 census.), and died in Old Soldiers Home in Ft Leavenworth.

 

Notes for ALMIRA KATHERINE WICKS:

remained with the Potawatomi Tribe after they moved to Kansas and she is buried on her allotment (not in cemetery) southeast of Tecumseh, Oklahoma with 2 of her grandchildren

___________________________________

From Shelia Jones

Another interesting note was the story about Elsina Sabrey's story about how she met her husband.  Almira married Albrecht Werth, a German teacher from Austria on 05-22-1864, Council Bluffs, Iowa.  He was a private Co C 1st Nebraska Vet Calvary from 03-26-64.  Elsina was married 07-01-1866 to a member of the 1st Nebraska Regiment.

Now for Almira's family.

Almira was married to Albrecht Werth 05-22-1864.  He taught German for the Army and he was a private in Co C 1st Nebraska Vet Calvary from 03-26-64 until his death in 1866. 

    He and Almira (roll 575) had one daughter Virginia who was born in 1865 in Ft Kerney, Nebraska.  Virginia married William Best and died 02-09-1945 in Salina, Missouri.

Almira then married William C. Baylis, 08-02-1868, Silverlake, Kansas.  She and William had 5 children.  She died 01-09-1896, on her indian allotment, southeast of Tecumseh, Oklahoma and is buried there.  William married Lina after Almira died and had another daughter.  He died at the Old Soldiers Home in Ft Leavenworth is buried at the national cemetery there.  At the original allotment of Almira's, you can still see the imprint of where their first log cabin was built so it is a special place to me.

    Charles was born in 1867, Silverlake, Kansas.  Charles is listed in the 1870 census but not the 1880 census so it is assumed he died.

    Pricilla T. (roll 577) was born 10-14-1869, Kansas.  Sad to say that she was mentally ill and committed to the Indian Mental Hospital in Kansas.  She is buried at Fairview Cemetery near the indian allotments in Oklahoma.  Not sure of her death but am researching it and it was after 1900.  She never married.

    Cyrus William (roll 578) was born 11-30-1871 at Rossville, Kansas.  He died 02-15-1938 at the El Reno Indian Hospital, Oklahoma and is buried at Fairview Cemetery.  He married Ida Hancock 12-01-1894 and she died 10-16-13.  His children to follow.

    Laura I. (roll 579) was born 08-01-1873 in Kansas and she married Lewis Nadeau in Kansas.  They had 2 children Daniel and Renie.  Laura was a blonde and lived her life on her indian allotment in Oklahoma.

    Iwildie (Wilda) R. (roll 580) was born 11-05-1875 in Kansas.  She was married to a I.P. Sellars but had no children.  She sold her allotment as soon as she got it and she was a beauty as you will see when I send the pictures.  She died at Grand Island, Nebraska sometime after 1900.  I am still researching this.

___________________________________________________

This must be her!!

Jesuit Mission and college records, 1832-1967  St. Mary's College (St. Marys, Kansas). Archives

Anna Maria Catherina <Stoutly> 

  Female    

 

Event(s):

 Birth: 

 Christening:  17 JUN 1838   Jesuit Mission And College-Catholic, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa

 

 

Parents:

  Father:  Weeks Stoutly 

  Mother:  Catharina Muller 

 

 

 

More About ALMIRA KATHERINE WICKS:

Burial: on her allotment (not a cemetery) southeast of Tecumseh, Oklahoma with 2 of her grandchildren

 

Notes for ALBRECHT WERTH:

 

 

      Werth, Albert      Union       Cavalry       1st Battalion, Nebraska Cavalry

      Werth, Alfred      Union       Cavalry       1st Regiment, Nebraska Cavalry

______________________

Nebraska Volunteers, 1861-69 

 

Surname      Given Name      Company      Regiment or Battalion      Rank      Residence

Werth    Albrecht "Alfred"  C      1st Regt      Private      Omaha, Neb

 

 

More About ALBRECHT WERTH and ALMIRA WICKS:

Marriage: May 22, 1864, Council Bluffs, Iowa (Source: Sheila Jones.)

 

Notes for WILLIAM C. BAYLIS:

1870 U.S. Census Kansas Shawnee Silverlake Township

 Baylis, William, age 26, male, white, Farmer, 500, 300, B. Penn

" Elmira, 31, female, indian, keeps house, B. Iowa   

" Virginia, 5, female, indian, B. Nebraska

"Charles, 3, male, indian, B. Kansas

" Pavilla  3/12(?), female, indian, B. Kansas

they are living very near Elmira's brother John                

_______________________________________

1880 census

C. Wm. BAYLIS   Self   M   Male   W   45   PA   Farmer   ENG   IRE 

 Katherine BAYLIS   Wife   M   Female   W   41   IA   Keeping House   NY   MI 

 Presila BAYLIS   Dau   S   Female   W   10   KS      PA   IA 

 W. Cyrus BAYLIS   Son   S   Male   W   9   KS      PA   IA 

 Laura BAYLIS   Dau   S   Female   W   7   KS      PA   IA 

 Idewilde BAYLIS   Dau   S   Female   W   5   KS      PA   IA 

 Virginia WORTH   SDau   S   Female   W   15   NE      BAVARIA   IA 

 

Source Information:

  Census Place Rossville, Shawnee, Kansas

  Family History Library Film   1254397

  NA Film Number   T9-0397

  Page Number   255B

 

 

More About WILLIAM BAYLIS and ALMIRA WICKS:

Marriage: August 02, 1868, Silverlake, Kansas

     

Child of ALMIRA WICKS and ALBRECHT WERTH is:

                   i.       VIRGINIA4 WERTH, b. 1865, Fort Kerney, Nebraska; d. February 09, 1945, Salina, Missouri (Source: Sheila Jones.); m. WILLIAM BEST, Abt. 1891; b. Abt. 1863, North Carolina.

 

Notes for VIRGINIA WERTH:

In 1910 William and Virginia are at

State:  Missouri    

County:  PETTIS    

Locale:  2-WD SEDALIA    

Series:  T624    

Roll:  801    

Part:  1    

Page:  152B    

William Best is 48-married once for 16 years and he and his parents were born in North Carolina, he is a farmer

Virginia is 45-and is listed as having no children

________________________________________

1920 U.S. Census Missouri Pettis Sedalia ED# 146

Best, Virginia A.-head-female-white-age 64-divorced-born Nebraska-FB Germany-MB Iowa

_____________________________________

1930 U.S. Federal Census > Missouri > Pettis > Sedalia > District 20

Best, Virginia A-head-female-white-age 65-divorced-was married at age 26-born Nebraska-FB Nebraska-MB Iowa-gardener

 

Notes for WILLIAM BEST:

Intersting to note that there is a William A. best living in the same town as Virginia in 1930. He is 68 and born in South Carolina. He is married to a woman named Lavada who is 55 and his step daughter who is 37 is living there with her spouse. William is also living in the same town in 1920 with his wife...could this be Virginia's husband?

 

More About WILLIAM BEST and VIRGINIA WERTH:

Marriage: Abt. 1891

 

     

Children of ALMIRA WICKS and WILLIAM BAYLIS are:

                  ii.       CHARLES4 BAYLIS, b. 1867, Silverlake, Kansas; d. Bef. 1880.

 

Notes for CHARLES BAYLIS:

Poss died before 1880 not in census with his family

 

                 iii.       PRICILLA T. BAYLIS, b. October 14, 1869, Kansas; d. Aft. 1900.

14.           iv.       CAP CYRUS WILLIAM BAYLIS, b. November 30, 1871, Rossville, Kansas; d. February 15, 1938, El Reno Indian Hospital, Oklahoma.

15.            v.       LAURA ISABELLE BAYLIS, b. August 01, 1873, Kansas; d. June 30, 1935.

                 vi.       IWILDIE R BAYLIS, b. November 05, 1875, Kansas; d. Aft. 1900, Grand Island, Nebraska; m. I.P. SELLARS.

 

Notes for IWILDIE R BAYLIS:

1900 census

Lived in:  Wilson Township, Ellsworth County, Kansas

Series: T623     Microfilm:  480     Book:  1     Page:  321    

in Witer family

Baylis, Willda A.-servant-white-female-born Nov 1876-age 23-single-born Kansas-FB New York-MB Iowa-hotel waitress

___________________________

Iwildie (Wilda) R. (roll 580) was born 11-05-1875 in Kansas.  She was married to a I.P. Sellars but had no children.  She sold her allotment as soon as she got it and she was a beauty as you will see when I send the pictures.  She died at Grand Island, Nebraska sometime after 1900.

 

 

Enter supporting content here